Capacity Building & Youth Active Citizenry Consultation and Survey for : Thembelihle Informal Settlement and KwaNokuthula

This report outlines Week 1 and 2 progress on the above project. Thembelihle Informal Settlement is in the South of City of Joburg, with an estimated 8000 households (source – community leaders). The Thembelihle settlement “was established on municipal-owned land in the mid-1980s by rural migrants and employees of a brick manufacturing company.”

The project owner is the Foundation for Human Rights (FHR) under the program known as AMARIGHTZA, also known as ‘Socio-economic Justice for All-SEJA’, in partnership with the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DOJ&CD).

FHR commissioned a youth active citizenry preliminary consultation in Thembelihle Informal Settlement. The report is based on interventions conducted in two weeks (27 March up to April) it involved participation of youth and key stakeholder. The process has been outlined on the methodology section of the report. The challenge was getting buy in into the community as initial sentiments revealed mistrusts and that the process was a third force invasion. Researcher took it upon themselves to make one on one discussions with participants, series of trips to the community and eventually cleared the mist around the project and where the discourse locates itself within the South Africa legal framework.

Continue reading below or download the full “Monitoring and Evaluating the Progressive Realisation of the Right to Capacity Building & Youth Active Citizenry Consultation and Survey for : Thembelihle Informal Settlement and KwaNokuthulaWater and Sanitation in South Africa” resource.

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